Mango Mint

Author: Nicky Garratt
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 9781604868890
Size: 17.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 80

Nicky Garratt’s love of Arabian, Indian, and North African cuisine is obvious in this mouth-watering collection of vegan recipes. Challenging the notion that meals require a centerpiece—historically based around the kill from the hunt or domesticated herd—this recipe collection offers satisfying menus in both buffet style and formal sit-down meals using the vegan philosophy of an intelligent use of the resources available. The full-color photographs offer ideas for presentation, and the book includes sections on planning meals in advance to save money and maximize resources as well as a selection of recipes that utilizes often-discarded items as ingredients—such as watermelon rinds and beet tops in addition to the common problem of easily forgotten leftovers. The flavor of Arabic and North African cuisine is seen in the recipes for Baba Ghannouj, Red Pepper Bulgar, Spinach Pies, Harissa, and Donuts in Syrup, while Indian favorites such as Apple Soup, Peanut Vada, Chana Masala with Green Chili, and Mango Rice also make an appearance. The recipes range from quick and easily created to relatively complex, all of which require only basic equipment and rudimentary skill. The book contains an index for fresh ingredients that enables one to quickly locate a recipe by provisions already found in the refrigerator.

Indian Cook Book

Author: Mary Kennedy Core
Publisher: eBookIt.com
ISBN: 9781456614256
Size: 15.90 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 47

Many regard curry as one of the new things in cookery. This is a mistake. Curry is an old, old method of preparing meats and vegetables. Nor is it an East Indian method exclusively. In all Oriental and tropical countries foods are highly seasoned, and although the spices may differ, and although the methods of preparation may not be the same, nevertheless, generally speaking, the people of all Oriental countries freely indulge in curried food. However, in India curry reaches its perfection. The people of India since Vedic times have eaten curry and always will. They eat it very, very hot, and Europeans who live in India soon find themselves falling into the habit of eating very hot and spicy foods. Whether it is good for one to eat as much hot stuff as one is expected to eat in India is a disputed point. In moderation, however, curry is not harmful, and is a very satisfactory and appetizing way of preparing scrappy and inexpensive meats. If carefully prepared, everybody is sure to like it. ....